Investors in Cats
Welsh Saints and Martyrs
Cadwaladr

Welsh Icons
About Wales

and all things Welsh

Cadwaladr

 Back

 Previous

Next

Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon (c. 633682, reigned from c. 655) (Latin: Catuvelladurus; English: Cadwallader), also known as Cadwaladr Fendigaid ('the Blessed') was a king of Gwynedd. According to the Historia Brittonum he "reigned among the Britons" as high king. Later Brythonic legend (notably the 10th Century Armes Prydein) regarded him as the promised deliverer, who would one day return to lead the Brythons to victory against the Saxons (a role which Arthur would later assume). Geoffrey of Monmouth included him in his Historia Regum Britanniae (vii,3) as the last in the line of legendary Kings of the Britons. His supposed standard, the red dragon, was later adopted by Henry VII of England, founder of the Tudor dynasty , who claimed descent from Cadwaladr.

The son of Cadwallon ap Cadfan, Cadwaladr was only a child when his father was killed by the army of Oswald of Bernicia at the Battle of Heavenfield, and Cadafael Cadomedd took over in Gwynedd. Raised abroad, either in Ireland, Brittany or in a neighboring Welsh kingdom, Cadwaladr eventually reclaimed his family's throne from Cadafael. He went on to challenge the West Saxons in Somerset in 658, unsuccessfully. Cadwaladr was arguably the last Welsh ruler to mount a serious counteroffensive against the Anglo-Saxon forces that had overrun Southern Britain since the fall of the Western Roman Empire. It may be for this reason that Geoffrey of Monmouth chose to end his narrative of British kings with Cadwaladr.

After these initial military escapades, Cadwaladr seemingly settled down and focused on the domestic situation, establishing several religious foundations in Gwynedd and gaining a reputation as a devout, pious leader; so much so that, after his death, the Welsh church came to regard him as a saint.

According to the Annales Cambriae, he died of plague in 682. The earlier Historia Brittonum suggest he was the victim of an earlier plague, in 663/664, but such an early death would seem to extend the reign of his successor, Idwal to an improbable length.


 

Comment Script
Post this page to: del.icio.us Yahoo! MyWeb Digg reddit Furl Blinklist Spurl

Comments

Name
E-mail (Will not appear online)
Title
Comment
;-) :-) :-D :-( :-o >-( B-) :oops: :-[] :-P
[Home] [Food & Drink] [Symbols] [Sport] [Products] [Places] [Buildings] [Artists] [Entertainers] [Events] [Famous Welsh] [Journalists] [Musicians] [Politicians] [Songs] [Writers] [Welsh Info] [About Us] [Vox Pop] [Contact Us] [Forums] [Our Sponsors] [Welsh Produce] [Arts & Crafts]

All copyrights acknowledged with thanks to Wikipedia. Another site by 3Cat Design 2006-2008
Whilst we try to give accurate information, we accept no liability for loss or incorrect information listed on this site or from material embedded on this site from external sources such as YouTube.
If you do spot a mistake, please let us know.
Email: [email protected]

 

 

Help Keep this site
running

 

 

Key

Bold Red
Internal Link
Red
External Link

 Admission Charges
 Address
 Arts/Galleries
 Buses
 B&Bs/Guest Houses Campsites/Caravans
 Castles
 Credit Cards
 Cricket
 Disabled Facilities
 Email
 Farmers Markets
 Fax
 Film
 Food
 Football
 Parks/Gardens
 Golf
 Historic Houses
 Hotels
 Libraries
 Museums
 Opening Hours
 Places of Worship
 Pubs/Bars
 Rugby
 Schools/Colleges
 Shops/Gifts
 Taxis:
 Telephone No.
 Theatres
 Tourist Information
 Trains
 Vets
 Web Address
 Welsh Produce
 Youth Hostels
llustration(s) or photograph(s) viewable Illustration(s) or
       photograph(s)