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Colwinston (Welsh: Tregolwyn) is a village in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales.

Colwinston is known for the medieval church of St Michael and All Angels, subject of a major restoration project to celebrate the millennium. The church is a Grade 1 listed building. Close by are St David's Church-in-Wales Primary School, the Village Hall, the village green and the Sycamore Tree Inn (dating from the 17th century or earlier). Colwinston was the only village in Wales which lost no men in World War I.

Colwinston has its own community council with seven elected members. The population of the village in 2005 was approximately 400. The major social event of the year is the annual village festival, held on the second weekend in July. Other annual events include a pantomime and the New Year's Day sport of "collyball".

Colwinston trivia: The novelist Agatha Christie was a frequent visitor to the village, where her descendants still live.


 Pubs/Bars in Colwinston:
 Sycamore Inn
       Coed Masarnen,
       Colwinston,
       Cowbridge.
       South Glamorgan
       CF71 7NG
 01656 652827


 Schools/Colleges in Colwinston:
 St David's C.I.W. Primary
       Colwinston
       Vale of Glamorgan
       CF71 7NL
 01656 656447
 01656 656447


Colwinstone, or Trê Golwen - From 'A Topographical Dictionary of Wales' (1849)
COLWINSTONE, or TRÊ GOLWEN, a parish, in the union of Bridgend and Cowbridge, hundred of Ogmore, county of Glamorgan, South Wales, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Cowbridge; containing 287 inhabitants. This parish is situated in the southern part of the county, near the Bristol Channel, and is intersected by the Bristol and Milford Haven road. It is bounded on the north by the parishes of Llangan and Ewenny, by Penllyne on the east, by Llŷsworney on the south, and by St. Bride's Major and Llandow on the west and southwest. The parish contains 1667a. 29p. partly arable and partly pasture, and 83a. 2r. 10p. of common, with about 9½ acres occupied by roads. Its surface is rather flat, but well wooded, the trees being chiefly ash, elm, and sycamore; the soil is in some parts light and in others clayey, producing wheat, barley, and oats, with hay and turnips. Colwinstone village is situated near the Allom brook. The parish contains some lead-ore and some limestone-quarries, but no lead-mines are worked. A large tract of waste ground within its limits, called "Golden Mile," extending about three-quarters of a mile along the turnpike-road, is noted for its fine pasturage, and numerous flocks of sheep are fed on it. Pwll-yWrach, the property and residence of David Thomas, Esq., is a respectable, well-built, modern mansion, pleasantly situated in the parish.

The living is a discharged vicarage, rated in the king's books at £6. 6. 8., and endowed with £200 private benefaction, and £400 royal bounty; net income, £130; patron, David Thomas, Esq., who is lord of the manor, and to whom the impropriation also belongs. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £124; and the vicarial for one of £88, with a glebe of 2½ acres, valued at £3. 2. 6. per annum. The church, dedicated to St. Michael, is a plain structure, containing between 150 and 200 sittings. There are places of worship for Calvinistic Methodists, Baptists, and Wesleyans. A day school is chiefly supported by the vicar and Mr. and Miss Thomas, and a Sunday school is gratuitously conducted by the Calvinistic Methodists. A rent-charge of £1 is paid by the lord of the manor for the benefit of the poor, supposed to arise from a gift by an ancestor; it is allowed to accumulate for two or three years, and is then distributed in small sums among persons not receiving parochial aid. On the Golden Mile common is a tumulus, and near it are vestiges of a small Roman camp: the Roman Julia strata maritima is supposed to have passed, in this part, near the course of the present turnpikeroad.



 

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